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  • Mainichi: NJ now eligible for GOJ “economic stimulus” bribe. But not all NJ residents.

    Posted by Dr. ARUDOU, Debito on December 1st, 2008

    Handbook for Newcomers, Migrants, and Immigrants to Japan\Foreign Residents and Naturalized Citizens Association forming NGO\「ジャパニーズ・オンリー 小樽入浴拒否問題と人種差別」(明石書店)JAPANESE ONLY:  The Otaru Hot Springs Case and Racial Discrimination in Japan

    Hi Blog.  The GOJ has finally made it clear, after overmuch deliberation, that the “economic stimulus” cum political bribe to voters package will also be disbursable to non-voting taxpayers, i.e. NJ.  However, not all.  Only those with Permanent Residency or marriage with a Japanese.  So too bad you taxpaying residents who don’t marry or haven’t been by the grace of Immigration been granted permanent leave to remain.  You don’t get a sou for your contributions.  It’s better than nothing, and indeed is a sign of progress, but why the lines are drawn there are still mysterious.  Anyone with an address in Japan who is paying taxes should be eligible for the rebate.  But no.  Debito in Iwate.

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    Individuals to receive 12,000 yen under outline for cash handouts

    (Mainichi Japan) November 28, 2008

    http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/20081128p2a00m0na017000c.html

    Courtesy JYLO

    Individuals will receive a minimum of 12,000 yen each under an outline on the distribution of 2 trillion yen in cash disbursements to the majority of households across Japan that was drafted on Friday, government officials said.

    Discretion on distributing the financial handouts will be left to local governments, as the number of recipients could be limited based on their income.

    The plan is part of the government’s stimulus package amid the economic slowdown triggered by the global financial crisis.

    According to the draft plan, the cash will be doled out to households by transferring the money to individual accounts at financial institutions after the head of each household files an application by postal mail to local governments.

    The draft says it is desirable to start supplying the cash to households before the end of fiscal 2008, but the actual starting date will be decided by each municipal government. The deadline for applications is still being debated and will be either within three months or six months.

    While the government and the ruling coalition had earlier pledged to finish distributing the cash to all households before the end of this fiscal year, it has emerged that it will be unfeasible.

    The Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications on Friday held a meeting in Tokyo to explain the draft outline of the cash disbursements to officials of prefectural governments and municipal governments of major cities across the nation.

    Under the draft plan, each municipal government will send application forms to the heads of households, who will be expected to return them with their bank account details. Municipal governments will confirm the identity of recipients by requiring them to send copies of their bankbooks and driver’s licenses together with their application. The officials may also transfer the cash to accounts already on record for use in withdrawing utility fees.

    If an individual cannot file an application through postal mail, the head of a household can visit the municipal government office and go through procedures to have the cash transferred to their account. Supplying the money through municipal government offices is also an option, but for safety reasons, it will be limited to cases where bank transfers are difficult.

    The amount of cash to be doled out will be 12,000 yen per person, and additional 8,000 yen will be paid to those aged over 65 or under 18. The base date for determining a person’s age will be either Jan. 1 or Feb. 1 next year.

    The cash will be provided by municipal governments where recipients have their residency registered as of the base date. As for foreigners, the cash allowance will be distributed to permanent foreign residents and the foreign spouses of Japanese nationals.

    Municipal governments that opt to limit the number of recipients based on their income can decline to pay a cash allowance to those who earned at least 18 million yen in 2009. Municipal authorities will try to obtain consent from recipients to use their tax information to confirm their income before deciding on whether they are eligible for the cash allowance. If recipients refuse to allow use of the information, municipal officials can withhold from paying cash to them.

    Many municipal governments are apprehensive toward the plan because it will bring about complex clerical work such as confirming recipients’ incomes. The ministry will work out further details of the plan while hearing opinions from municipal government officials.

    All expenses that arise for the cash disbursements will be covered by the central government, except for expenses to purchase equipment.

    ENDS

    15 Responses to “Mainichi: NJ now eligible for GOJ “economic stimulus” bribe. But not all NJ residents.”

    1. jim Says:

      congradulations to the GOJ, they finally did something half-ass right for a change..they gave NJ family members there token 12000yen..LETS have a PARTY!!

    2. Drew Says:

      It’s better than nothing, and indeed is a sign of progress, but why the lines are drawn there are still mysterious. Anyone with an address in Japan who is paying taxes should be eligible for the rebate. But no. Debito in Iwate.

      No, it is not better than nothing. Not at all.

      I’m sick of the government doing measures like this. It’s just a way of making the PRs, the ones with the most political clout, happy so they will abandon their NJ brothers and keep quiet.

      Because of this one move, the blogs will be totally silent about this, and people like me who have the gall to fall in love with someone who isn’t Japanese will be left out in the cold again.

      – Point taken. This blog for one won’t be silent about this. Make your points heard here.

    3. Mark in Yayoi Says:

      “Municipal governments will confirm the identity of recipients by requiring them to send copies of their bankbooks and driver’s licenses together with their application. “

      So it’s basically a Y12,000 payment in return for allowing the government to inspect people’s financial histories?

      Is that the going rate for market research expenses?

      And shame on the government for once again drawing a line between the privileged foreigners who’ll get their money and the underclass who won’t (but have to subsidize those who do by paying taxes).

      Maybe this is why they’re not making it any easier to get PR. They need more people to take money from.

    4. AWK Says:

      >So it’s basically a Y12,000 payment in return for allowing the government to inspect people’s financial histories?

      Exactly, this is why I wrote in another threat that I`m not interested in bribe. This way they will find out exactly who and how much people made and whether you paid your taxes first. Then you may be eligible for this brainless stimulus package.

    5. Oidon Says:

      “[...] but why the lines are drawn there are still mysterious.”

      Not that I agree at all, but it rather makes sense to me. Those on spouse visas have Japanese spouses that can and do make a fuss about issues like this. Japan listens to its Japanese citizens.

      To a lesser extent those with PR may make a little fuss. However, PR is supposedly a step up from a spouse visa and a step down from being a citizen. Thus, if you are going to give to those on spouse visas, then it is hard to argue not giving it to those with PR. Possibly in the near future voting rights will be extended to those with PR, and this free handout may buy a few votes someday.

      Everyone else is just screwed.

    6. Massimo Says:

      I wonder…………why do we pay taxes…………???

      Do we just have obligations but no rights here, I have no words.
      I do not have a permanent visa but it is 12 years that I’m here
      and I pay taxes, well I feel invisible.
      I’m from Europe and I’ve never seen something like this.

      I don’t want to pay taxes anymore…

    7. Simon Says:

      People, do you ever *think* before you jump on the “Japan hates meeeee” bandwagon?

      >>Municipal governments will confirm the identity of recipients by requiring them to send copies of their bankbooks and driver’s licenses together with their application. The officials may also transfer the cash to accounts already on record for use in withdrawing utility fees.

      [unwarranted snipe snipped]: ** They want to confirm the identity of recipients. They probably only want to copy the first page of your bankbook – the one with your name and bank account information on it. Look at the second sentence – see what the officials may also do? Hint: They may transfer the cash to accounts already on record. If they’re already on record, wow, they probably don’t need to check the account again! **

    8. Simon Says:

      PS: To Massimo. Fine, stop paying taxes, stop using the roads, stop using taxpayer-funded public transport, stop using the water and gas systems, stop reading your local community bulletin, stop watching NHK. [snip]

    9. Bob Says:

      Simon, addressing Massimo, wrote: “stop using the roads”

      I do not drive. Close the roads; too much traffic makes it take longer to walk where I go.

      “stop using taxpayer-funded public transport”

      Like the trains which I pay for daily?

      “stop using the water and gas systems”

      I pay for those every month, too.

      “stop reading your local community bulletin”

      I do not recall ever receiving one. I suppose that there may be some nearby.

      “stop watching NHK.”

      Done. I refuse to purchase a TV because of 放送法32条.

      “Fine, stop paying taxes”

      I only real reason to continue paying is so that you do not forfeit your visa.

    10. Rich Says:

      >I do not drive. Close the roads; too much traffic makes it take longer to walk where I go.

      Pavements are funded by tax dollars, so you’d better stop walking as well. Furthermore your argument is moot. The roads are provided to give you an opportunity to drive should you wish to do so – if you choose not to take that option it’s just your decision. How do you think that everything you’ve ever bought gets delivered? What do the buses run on? The roads are used for a lot more than just your car.

      >Like the trains which I pay for daily?

      Again, you may pay for a specific journey but a huge amount of the infrastructure was and is paid for by tax. Go take a look at the UK and discover that the price of a journey roughly the equivalent distance of Tokyo to Osaka is over 20,000 (equiv.) and then complain about your relatively cheap train fare.

      >I pay for those every month, too.

      Ditto. See above.

      >Done. I refuse to purchase a TV because of 放送法32条.

      Actually that may help you somewhat. Once you’ve cut off your own nose to spite your face, perhaps you won’t suffer so much from the stench of having to dispose of your own garbage, since that’s also paid for by your tax. Oh and for god’s sake *never* set foot in a park again, and check one of your neighbors has a ladder to rescue you when the fire service don’t show up. [Further invective deleted.]

    11. Massimo Says:

      I really don’t understand the bitterness and arrogance of some people.
      Paying taxes is a “MUST” but since “WE” pay them (or at least,
      “I” pay them) I PRETEND to be considered as any other “citizen”
      what is it strange with that ?
      A nice protest against this could be to REFUSE to pay taxes but we should
      do it EN MASSE (thing that with an attitude as some above show is, sadly,
      impossible….)

      The fantastic system that will be used for this splendid project(checks of driver’s licenses,
      bank accounts etc.) will be a HUGE waste of money in terms of manpower, time,
      whereas big head Aso could have just helped all of us with a tax deduction for everybody.
      And it’s also MY MONEY.

      And since IIIIIIIIIIII ALSO PAY taxes すごくムカツクンだよ!
      俺のお金もみんなに渡って俺だけに戻んないのはなんなんだよ~

      Lastly, zainichi Koreans are not fingerprinted (like we stupids are) because they
      fought for what they thought it was right. And they did it ALL together.
      Again, impossible, just look to some comments above…..

      It’s not a “hate Japan” bandwagon, it’s a “I also have my rights” bandwagon
      which in my modest opinion is good not only for me, but also to make Japan a better
      country. If I hated Japan I’d not be here 12 years and deeply studied the culture,
      literature, philosophy, arts and language. Duh.

      Politics are NOT a country.

    12. Shaun Dyer Says:

      I’m still not happy with the outcome of this fiasco concerning the one-time payment of 12,000 yen (which in any case is a paltry sums when you consider the annual costs of keeping an average household of a family of four). It’s fine for Japanese nationals and those few foreign nationals with PR or with a Japanese spouse (of which I’m one on both counts) to receive this money, but the policy does not take into account the tens of thousands (is this the right figure?) of us foreign nationals who abide by the law and pay the due taxes. All tax-paying individuals should be able to avail of the same returns from their tax payments in a fair manner, whether they be permanent residents, spouses of Japanese or residents on a limited term working visa, since the tax rates are the same for whatever legal status (although of course their are a few privilages such as the right to vote and have a say in how one’s taxes are spent that are limited to Japanese nationals only). There are some arguments above concerning what benefits should be available to whom, but the fact is that the use of roads, parks, public transport etc. is open to anyone (including short-term tourists who only pay taxes in the form of consumption tax). The basis of the argument that has been going on here is whether it’s logical and fair to take from all taxpayers and only give benefits back to a certain group (Japanese nationals, spouses of Japanese and permanent residents). The last that I would like to ask is whether there is some fund to which I can contribute the 12,000 yen which would benefit the rights of all foreign nationals in Japan, whether they be permanent resdents, spouses of Japanese nationals or even non-legal residents who still contribute to Japan’s economy.

      – Since there are close to a million people with PR, and an unknown number of non PRs with J spouses (assuming it’s not the overwhelming majority of the reminder of the other million plus people), that means it’s hundreds of thousands of NJ who abide by the law and pay the due taxes.

    13. James M Says:

      So what are all of you with PR going to spend your money on? I can’t decide whether to get a subscription to the Akahata (about one year of the big Sunday issue), give it in one big lump to the DPJ, or buy some pork and daikon and make my own impromptu tonjiru soup kitchen in front of Aso’s house. Decisions, decisions.

    14. jim Says:

      today in the daily yomiuri it says that fukushima prefecture has become the first municipality in the nation to distribute application forms to its residents for money the government plans to give as cash handouts, but guess who got left out? yea thats right me and you NJ. They said that the municipality decided not to send the forms to NJ residents of the prefecture for the time being, as the procedure for providing the cash handout (TO SUCH PEOPLE) is still under review. Im serious can you believe this, im not making this up check on page 3 of the National section. So even tax paying residents that are married to japanese are apparently not even regonized. This is insane. check for yourself february 25th, in the english edition newspaper…

      – Make it easier for us to find it. Send us a link. Or the exact title of the article so we can Google it. Or best of all, send us the entire article after downloading it. Thanks.

    15. Christine Says:

      Hey Jim,
      Similar story here in Odawara city.
      Despite the National Government saying that people in my situation would be eligible to receive the payment, Odawara City isn’t.
      My husband who is Japanese read the city newsletter which is only in Japanese and it
      said that payments will only be given to those with spouse Visas and PR.
      I’ve worked in Japan for over 7 years, I’ve paid all my taxes and now I hear I won’t get it contrary to what we NJ taxpayers were led to believe.

      Talk about unfair.

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