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  • Debito interview with Asia Times: “Overcoming the ‘Japanese Only’ factor”, on human rights and Japan’s future

    Posted by Dr. ARUDOU, Debito on January 18th, 2012

    IN APPROPRIATE, A novel of culture, kidnapping, and revenge in modern Japan, By ARUDOU Debito

    New novel IN APPROPRIATE by ARUDOU Debito

    Handbook for Newcomers, Migrants, and Immigrants to Japan\" width=「ジャパニーズ・オンリー 小樽入浴拒否問題と人種差別」(明石書店)JAPANESE ONLY:  The Otaru Hot Springs Case and Racial Discrimination in Japansourstrawberriesavatardebitopodcastthumb
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    Hi Blog.  Last month I had an extensive interview with Victor Fic of the Asia Times on me, the Otaru Onsens Case, human rights in Japan, and the future.  It went up last week.  While long-term readers of Debito.org might not find much they haven’t heard before, it’s a good “catch-up” and summary of the issues for interested newbies.  Excerpt follows.  Arudou Debito

    //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    INTERVIEW
    Overcoming the ‘Japanese only’ factor
    By Victor Fic.  Asia Times, January 12, 2012, courtesy http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Japan/NA12Dh01.html

    When US-born Dave Aldwinckle became a Japanese citizen named Arudou Debito in 2000, two Japanese officials told him that only now did he have human rights in Japan. Such prejudice galvanized him into becoming a crusader against anti-gaijin(foreigner) discrimination after braving death threats to him and his family. Is Arudou throwing the egg of morality and legality against the rock of ancient bias? In this exclusive interview with Asia Times Online contributor Victor Fic, he sees Japan turning inward. 

    […]

    TO  David “foolish” Aldwinkle [sic]
    GET OUT OF JAPAN
    YOU ARE A FUCKING GAIJIN
    NOT A JAPANESE
    FUCK YOU!!
    GAIJIN LIKE YOU ARE RUINING THIS COUNTRY
    WE WILL KILL YOUR KIDS
    YOU CALL THIS DISCRIMINATION?
    YOU WANT MONEY THAT MUCH?
    GO HOME YANKEE CUNT!
    – Death threat in English and Japanese, postmarked February 5, 2001, from Asahikawa, Hokkaido, with a fake name that literally means “full of sperm”, and a fake organization called “Friends of Onsen Local 2″.  Reproduced in “Japanese Only: The Otaru Hot Springs Case and Racial Discrimination in Japan” (Akashi Shoten, Inc. 2006), page 305. [NB: This was the original opening to the interview that Mr. Fic filed with the Asia Times.  It was removed by the editors, which is a pity.  Racial discrimination is an ugly thing, and the content and tone of this death threat is but one symptom.]

    Victor Fic: Did you ever think that you would become a Japanese citizen? 

    Arudou Debito: Hell no! I wasn’t even interested in foreign languages as a child. But I moved from my birthplace, California, to upstate New York at age five and traveled much overseas, learning early to communicate with non-native English speakers. I’d lived a lot of my life outside the US before I graduated from high school and wasn’t afraid to leave home. But changing my citizenship and my name, however, was completely off the radar screen. I didn’t originally go to Japan to emigrate – just to explore. But the longer I stayed, the more reasonable it seemed to become a permanent resident, then a citizen. Buying a house and land was the chief reason that I naturalized – a mortgage means I can’t leave. More on me and all this on my blog [1].

    VF: The contrast with your earlier life is dramatic because you started life as an above average American guy in the northeast …

    AD: How do you define “average?” I certainly had opportunities. I grew up in a good educational district and had high enough grades to get into Cornell University, where I earned a degree in government. I springboarded into a quality graduate program at the Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies at the UC San Diego, and availed myself of excellent Japanese studies programs, including a mentor relationship with the late East Asia expert Chalmers Johnson. I then did the hard slog of learning the language and culture and it set me up my life as an academic, writer, commentator, and educator about issues Japanese.

    VF: Why do you insist that prejudice towards foreigners in Japan is severe? 

    AD: It’s systematic. In my latest Japan Times column [2] I discuss the lack of “fairness” as a latent cultural value in Japan. Japanese tend to see foreigners as unquestionably different from them, therefore it follows that their treatment will be different. Everything else stems from that. My column gives more details, but for now let me note that a 2007 Cabinet survey asked Japanese, “Should foreigners have the same human-rights protections as Japanese?” The total who agreed was 59.3%. This is a decline from 1995 at 68.3%, 1999 at 65.5% and 2003 at 54%. Ichikawa Hiroshi, who was a Saga Prefecture public prosecutor, said on May 23, 2011, that people in his position “were taught that … foreigners have no human rights ” [3]. Coming from law enforcement, that is an indicative and incriminating statement.

    VF: When immigrants to the West naturalize, they hear “congratulations!” But when you became Japanese, you were greeted with another statement … what was it? 

    AD: On October 11, 2000, I naturalized. And yes, I heard “congratulations”. But I was also visited at home by two representatives of Japan’s Public Safety Commission to tell me that they would now take action against the threats and harassment I had been getting during the Otaru Onsens case. They said clearly, “Now that you are a Japanese citizen, we want to protect your human rights.” Meaning rights to protect when I became a citizen – not before.

    VF: Can you cite practical examples from daily life? 

    AD: Sure…

    Interview continues at

    http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Japan/NA12Dh01.html

    2 Responses to “Debito interview with Asia Times: “Overcoming the ‘Japanese Only’ factor”, on human rights and Japan’s future”

    1. Charuzu Says:

      A very powerful interview.

      A question that I believe cries out for an answer based on the interview is what are your thoughts regarding children of marriages between an ethnically Japanese Japanese citizen and anyone else?

      One would think that for any such child who seems assured of a lifetime of discriminatory hostility, that Japan would be an unwelcome homeland.

      It would be like an Armenian living in Turkey.

      As such, what counsel do you offer those who may consider the path that you chose, with raising children in “Small Japan” who will forever be viewed as aliens, regardless of citizenship?

      – Right now, I don’t know. I’m thinking about it.

    2. Andrew in Saitama Says:

      Debito,
      I appologise if this is drifting too far, but do you think that one reason mainstream Japanese tend to deny racism exists in this country is the lack of media coverage that clearly calls racism exactly that?
      I’m thinking (a) specifically of “Human Rights” publications produced by local governments atnd the like that blame discrimination on the “differences in culture” rather than saying outright that people may be discriminated against because of racisit attitudes by others; and (b) generally, where an NJ is a victim of violence but the official police reports and/or media put the cause as “unknown” (assuming that the news outlet find time between their mandatory noodle specials, Nadeshiko reports and AKB updates – but I’ll save that gripe for another time)

      – Yes. I have written about this anti-“racism” labeling bias in J media for the Japan Times before. See here.

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