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  • NYT on Donald Keene “becoming one of them”, in an underresearched article that eulogizes the man before time

    Posted by Dr. ARUDOU, Debito on November 20th, 2012

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    Hi Blog.  I didn’t know the New York Times was in the habit of writing eulogies before their subject dies.  But that’s essentially what happened earlier this month with their write-up on Donald Keene.

    Frequent readers of Debito.org will remember why I take such a dim view of Keene’s ignominious actions at the twilight of an illustrious career.  I’ve devoted a Japan Times column to how a scholar of his standing used poor social science in his public statements alluding to the “Flyjin Myth” and the fiction of foreigners as criminals.  Despite this, Keene has still refused to acknowledge any of the good things that NJ residents have done (not only in terms of disaster relief “in solidarity” with “The Japanese”, but also on a day-to-day basis as workers, taxpayers, and non-criminals).  Nor has Keene amended his public statements in any way to reflect a less self-serving doctrine — thus elevating himself while denigrating others in his social caste.  In essence, Keene has essentially “pulled up the ladder behind him”, stopping others from enjoying the same trappings of what the NYT claims is “acceptance”.  Thus, how NJ sempai in Japan (even after naturalization) eat their young to suit themselves is a fascinating dynamic that this article inadvertently charts.

    This article represents a missed research opportunity for an otherwise incredibly thorough reporter (Martin has written peerless articles on Fukushima, and I simply adored his report on the Ogasawaras).  How about this for a research question:  Why else might The Don have naturalized?   I say it doesn’t involve the self-hugging cloaked as some odd form of self-sacrifice.  How about investigating the fact that while gay marriage is not allowed in Japan, adoption (due to the vagaries of the Koseki Family Registry system) is a common way for same-sex partners to pass on their inheritance and legacies to their loved ones — by making them part of their family.  Naturalization makes it clear that there will be no extranationality conceits to interfere with the smooth transfer of claims.  This article could have been a fine peg to hang that research on.

    Not to mention the fact that even seasoned journalists at the NYT can fall for The Fame:  Ever hear of the old adage that enables many a minority to receive the veneer of “acceptance” despite all the racialized reasons to deny it?  It’s called:  “They’ll claim us if we’re famous.”   Yes, so many lovely “thanks” from strangers in coffee shops; but as I’ve written before, The Don sadly won’t be around for any denouement once The Fame inevitably fades.

    (Then we get to a few semantic issues unduly unsophisticated for the NYT:  the old stereotypes within about Japan as “a racially homogeneous nation” — haven’t we gotten beyond that yet?  Well, there is a sop thrown in to qualify the reconfirmed Flyjin Myth with “many foreign residents and even Japanese left the country.”  Yes, EVEN Japanese left Japan.  Huh.  Of course, under normal circumstances, NJ would never stay and Japanese would never leave, even if the food chain is getting irradiated and the GOJ, as Martin has so assiduously reported in the past, has been unforthright about it.  But that’s me putting on my semantic “microaggression” cap; excuse the digression…)

    Anyway, if one gives the NYT the benefit of the doubt here, I think the tack of the article should have been, “A person has to jump through THIS many hoops in order to be considered ‘one of them’ [sic] in Japan?  Go through all of this, and you should be ‘accepted’ by the time you are, oh, say, ninety years old.”  Instead, this development is portrayed as a mutual victory for The Don and Japan.

    Why is this not problematized?  Because this article is a eulogy — it’s only saying the good things about a person (not yet) departed, and about a society that will not realize that it needs New Japanese who are younger and able to do more than just feebly salve (instead of save) a “wounded nation”.  That’s the bigger metaphor, I think, The Don’s naturalization represents to today’s Japan.  Arudou Debito

    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    New York Times, November 2, 2012
    Lifelong Scholar of the Japanese Becomes One of Them
    By MARTIN FACKLER, courtesy of AH

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/03/world/asia/with-citizenship-japan-embraces-columbia-scholar.html

    TOKYO — WITH his small frame hunched by 90 years of life, and a self-deprecating manner that can make him seem emotionally sensitive to the point of fragility, Donald Keene would have appeared an unlikely figure to become a source of inspiration for a wounded nation.

    Yet that is exactly how the New York native and retired professor of literature from Columbia University is now seen here in his adopted homeland of Japan. Last year, as many foreign residents and even Japanese left the country for fear of radiation from the Fukushima nuclear accident that followed a deadly earthquake and tsunami, Dr. Keene purposefully went the opposite direction. He announced that he would apply for Japanese citizenship to show his support.

    The gesture won Dr. Keene, already a prominent figure in Japanese literary and intellectual circles, a status approaching that of folk hero, making him the subject of endless celebratory newspaper articles, television documentaries and even displays in museums.

    It has been a surprising culmination of an already notable career that saw this quiet man with a bashful smile rise from a junior naval officer who interrogated Japanese prisoners during World War II to a founder of Japanese studies in the United States. That career has made him a rare foreigner, awarded by the emperor one of Japan’s highest honors for his contributions to Japanese literature and befriended by Japan’s most celebrated novelists.

    Dr. Keene has spent a lifetime shuttling between Japan and the United States. Taking Japanese citizenship seems a gesture that has finally bestowed upon him the one thing that eludes many Westerners who make their home and even lifelong friendships here: acceptance.

    “When I first did it, I thought I’d get a flood of angry letters that ‘you are not of the Yamato race!’ but instead, they welcomed me,” said Dr. Keene, using an old name for Japan. “I think the Japanese can detect, without too much trouble, my love of Japan.”

    That affection seemed especially welcome to a nation that even before last year’s triple disaster had seemed to lose confidence as it fell into a long social and economic malaise.

    During an interview at a hotel coffee shop, Japanese passers-by did double takes of smiling recognition — testimony to how the elderly scholar has won far more fame in Japan than in the United States. A product of an older world before the Internet or television, Dr. Keene is known as a gracious conversationalist who charms listeners with stories from a lifetime devoted to Japan, which he first visited during the Battle of Okinawa in 1945.

    BUT what is perhaps most remarkable about Dr. Keene is that Japan, a racially homogeneous nation that can be politely standoffish to non-Japanese, has embraced him with such warmth. When he legally became a Japanese citizen this year, major newspapers ran photographs of him holding up a handwritten poster of his name, Kinu Donarudo, in Chinese characters. To commemorate the event, a candy company in rural Niigata announced plans to build a museum that will include an exact replica of Dr. Keene’s personal library and study from his home in New York.

    He says he has been inundated by invitations to give public lectures, which are so popular that drawings are often held to see who can attend.

    “I have not met a Japanese since then who has not thanked me. Except the Ministry of Justice,” he added with his typically understated humor, referring to the government office in charge of immigration.

    With the patient air of someone who has tussled with Japanese bureaucracy before, he listed what he called the absurd requirements imposed upon him to take Japanese citizenship, including documentation to prove his completion of elementary school in New York City. Still, in a nation that welcomes few immigrants, Dr. Keene’s application was quickly approved. To become Japanese, Dr. Keene, who is unmarried, had to relinquish his American citizenship.

    His affection for Japan began in 1940 with a chance encounter at a bookstore near Times Square, where Dr. Keene, then an 18-year-old university student at Columbia, found a translation of the Tale of Genji, a 1,000-year-old novel from Japan. In the stories of court romances and intrigue, he found a refuge from the horrors of the world war then already unfolding in Europe and Asia.

    Dr. Keene later described it as his first encounter with Japan’s delicate sense of beauty, and its acceptance that life is fleeting and sad — a sentiment that would captivate him for the rest of his life.

    When the United States entered the war, he enlisted in the Navy, where he received Japanese-language training to become an interpreter and intelligence officer. He said he managed to build a rapport with the Japanese he interrogated, including one he said wrote him a letter after the war in which he referred to himself as Dr. Keene’s first P.O.W.

    LIKE several of his classmates, Dr. Keene used his language skills after the war to become a pioneer of academic studies of Japan in the United States. Among Americans, he is perhaps best known for translating and compiling a two-volume anthology in the early 1950s that has been used to introduce generations of university students to Japanese literature. When he started his career, he said Japanese literature was virtually unknown to Americans.

    “I think I brought Japanese literature into the Western world in a special way, by making it part of the literary canon at universities,” said Dr. Keene, who has written about 25 books on Japanese literature and history.

    In Japan, he said his career benefited from good timing as the nation entered a golden age of fiction writing after the war. He befriended some of Japan’s best known modern fiction writers, including Yukio Mishima and Kenzaburo Oe. Even Junichiro Tanizaki, an elderly novelist known for his cranky dislike of visitors, was fond of Dr. Keene, inviting him to his home. Dr. Keene says that was because he took Japanese culture seriously.

    “I was a freak who spoke Japanese and could talk about literature,” he joked.

    Japanese writers say that Dr. Keene’s appeal was more than that. They said he appeared at a time when Japan was starting to rediscover the value of its traditions after devastating defeat. Dr. Keene taught them that Japanese literature had a universal appeal, they said.

    “He gave us Japanese confidence in the significance of our literature,” said Takashi Tsujii, a novelist.

    Mr. Tsujii said that Dr. Keene was accepted by Japanese scholars because he has what Mr. Tsujii described as a warm, intuitive style of thinking that differs from what he called the coldly analytical approach of many Western academics. He said that this has made Dr. Keene seem even more Japanese than some of the Japanese novelists whom he has studied, like Mr. Mishima, an ultranationalist influenced by European intellectual fads.

    “Keene-san is already a Japanese in his feelings,” Mr. Tsujii said.

    Now, at the end of his career, Dr. Keene is again helping Japanese regain their confidence, this time by becoming one of them. Dr. Keene, who retired only last year from Columbia, says he plans to spend his final years in Japan as a gesture of gratitude toward the nation that finally made him one of its own.

    “You cannot stop being an American after 89 years,” Dr. Keene said, referring to the age at which he got Japanese citizenship. “But I have become a Japanese in many ways. Not pretentiously, but naturally.”
    ENDS

    13 Responses to “NYT on Donald Keene “becoming one of them”, in an underresearched article that eulogizes the man before time”

    1. Welp Says:

      ‘“I was a freak who spoke Japanese and could talk about literature,” he joked.’

      I wonder if the ironic undertones in this passage are intentional.

    2. Bignose Says:

      Shame on Fackler:

      1. BUT what is perhaps most remarkable about Dr. Keene is that Japan, a racially homogeneous nation that can be politely standoffish to non-Japanese, has embraced him with such warmth.

      2. To become Japanese, Dr. Keene, who is unmarried, had to relinquish his American citizenship.

      Fackler didn’t have the balls or the ethics to spit it out and say it clearly and why the infantile pseudoreality? Keene is “accepted” by the coterie of admirers who love the reflected glory of a high-status gaijin telling the Japanese what they like to hear, and because he’s temporary (he’s going to kick the bucket soon) and not going to have any kids because he’s 90 and gay. And what’s this about becoming Japanese? Doesn’t Fackler mean actually, gained Japanese citizenship after relinquishing his U.S. (not American) citizenship.

      So being Japanese means playing the role of telling Japanese people what they want to hear: I thought this kind of infantile nativist nonsense died out years ago. Look at the following two comments:
      “Keene-san is already a Japanese in his feelings,” Mr. Tsujii said.

      “You cannot stop being an American after 89 years,” Dr. Keene said, referring to the age at which he got Japanese citizenship. “But I have become a Japanese in many ways. Not pretentiously, but naturally.”

      In other words, I’m 100% behind Debito on this one: Keene is part of the PROBLEM, not the solution. And Fackler’s switch from spewing negative and slanted and agenda-laden opinion disguised as journalism (but he’s better than some of the lazy FCCJ gaijin that NYT has employed) to this sort of 3rd rate butter and cream puff (as opposed to hard hitting journalism) leaves a very queazy feeling in my stomach.

      Perhaps it’s a Columbia thing, you know, if you know, mutual back scratching. If it hadn’t been in the NYT I would have assumed this was written by some attention seeking, career ladder climbing hack in his or her 20s.

    3. Loverilakkuma Says:

      >“He gave us Japanese confidence in the significance of our literature”

      Well, duh. His visions only live within Chrysanthemum fantasy of Japanese literature. It doesn’t mean anything to the reality Japanese are facing today. He’s too old to know numerous problems surrounding Japanese society–i.e., poverty, discrimination, social injustice, violation of law, etc. These are definitely not in his vision of a sinking Japan.

    4. Jim Di Griz Says:

      @ Welp #1

      I think he does understand the irony. This is Don’s big, ‘in your face! I am completely accepted as Japanese in a way you other NJ never can be!’ delusional moment of apologist self-righteousness. In Don’s world, all his J-writer friends whom he translated and forced upon university canons (his words) have made cash out of Don’s efforts, and more importantly, now see themselves in the style of ‘Japanese who became famous abroad’, so of course they give Don the empty, obligatory flattery (‘he is more Japanese than the Japanese that didn’t buy my book’) that Don laps up as genuine.

      I like this;
      ‘During an interview at a hotel coffee shop, Japanese passers-by did double takes of smiling recognition’, which should read as;
      ‘Japanese passers-by did a double take at two (count them, two!) gaijin sitting in a coffee shop window, and one was really old- kawaii!!!’
      Maybe they have never seen a 90 year old white man in the flesh before, since Japan is so adept at removing incentives to stay into such advanced old age. Still, if you’ve got a nice fat inheritance to look forward to, I suppose you can play along. After all, what was the first thing Don did after he got here? Go on a long overseas cruise, IIRC.

      Shouldn’t Don be using his new found ‘insider’ status as an immigrant, and his literary connections, to put some kind of pressure on ‘The Japan That Can Say No’ Blinky to tone down the racism a bit? Nah, Don is Japanese now, so he’ll join in with the NJ-bullying.

    5. Tom R Says:

      Don made his whole life and legacy based on Japan he wouldn’t want that tarnished or destroyed. Don Keene sold out a long time ago and probably old age has made that easier to swallow. Let the old man have his twilight I say. He’ll be nothing more than a page in a history book very soon. We can only be thankful the future is not his to shape anymore.

    6. Bob Says:

      “Keene-san is already a Japanese in his feelings,” Mr. Tsujii said.

      This is Japanese-speak meaning; “Mr. Keene has stroked our egos sufficiently”

    7. Mike Says:

      Many fools love Japan until they find out what Japan is really about. Everything Don embraces about Japan will come back to haunt him if Ishihara and gang take over. We saw it during the tsunami- Japan thanks, but no thanks for all the international attention. Ishihara could care less about international help, they would rather dig in and gambare nihon! As Japan turns inward, doing what they are good at, putting up a front while behind the scenes Ishi and gang are working their mischief, Don will surely start to feel it. Then he will reach for all the usual canned excuses for Japans behavior, until he himself starts to be attacked.

    8. Fight Back Says:

      What really irks me about this guy is he wore the uniform before becoming the apologist-in-chief. To have been present for many of the atrocities Japan committed and yet to sell out in such an obvious fashion, I think, is degrading to those whom he served with at the time. 

      The other problem is the media focus on this guy, and the lack of focus on Debito’s achievements. Debito has done far more than this guy ever has for fellow NJ and yet this guy can use his connections to get the feature and get the attention while Debito has to deal with a mountain of negativity being heaped on him in the national media. Someone needs to cry foul! 

      Ignore the apologists at your peril, they have sucked up to the establishment long enough to get more than just a pat on the head. They are starting to use connections and influence to control the discourse and we need to be vigilant about it. 

      All those authors who laude Keene for his ‘soft’ stance would be far too afraid to go head to head with Debito, because he would never play the ‘good’ gaijin role to their satisfaction. 

      Yes, sometimes maybe Debito is the underdog, but the fight’s not over, and all of us have something to lose if we don’t win. 

    9. Becky Says:

      @Jim Di Griz #4
      “I like this;
      ‘During an interview at a hotel coffee shop, Japanese passers-by did double takes of smiling recognition’, which should read as;
      ‘Japanese passers-by did a double take at two (count them, two!) gaijin sitting in a coffee shop window, and one was really old- kawaii!!!’
      Maybe they have never seen a 90 year old white man in the flesh before, since Japan is so adept at removing incentives to stay into such advanced old age.”

      I had to burst out laughing when I read this! I have had the experience of sitting in a coffee shop in Osaka with an elderly friend from Switzerland. We had window seats, and people walking by did numerous double takes when they saw us. My friend asked me “are they staring because we’re foreign?” and out of kindness I didn’t reply “no, they’re staring because you’re so old.”

      Personally I don’t know anything about Keene, and wouldn’t recognise him in public if I saw him. I think it’s safe to say that the average Japanese person wouldn’t recognise him in public.

      – I wouldn’t be all that surprised, since the media has been all over him like Homer Simpson on a canned ham. But media coverage and memory in Japan is like a sun tan — it’ll fade pretty quickly.

    10. Becky Says:

      @Fight Back #8
      “The other problem is the media focus on this guy, and the lack of focus on Debito’s achievements. Debito has done far more than this guy ever has for fellow NJ and yet this guy can use his connections to get the feature and get the attention while Debito has to deal with a mountain of negativity being heaped on him in the national media. Someone needs to cry foul!”

      He’s 89! Debito is much younger. Give it time …

    11. dude Says:

      So he graduated University at the age of 20? Impressive.
      After initially reading this post, I did a bit of research on Don Keene – here is what I found:
      IMHO:
      He is very intelligent.
      He is very good at what he does.
      He does not understand/care about the challenges faced by others trying to make a go of it in Japan.
      He has little compassion, or empathy, for others.

      To many of us, it seems that he embraces a right-wing, nationalistic Japan. He has had a long and definitely life-altering relationship with the country, the language, and the people for almost all of his adult life. The problem I see is that like many old people, he does not embrace change. I doubt he would have much to discuss with younger Japanese people. I think he has trained himself to not have or express an opinion about Japanese politics… lest he wear out his welcome.

      In one sense, he is like a reporter documenting a story. He wants to get in close, but not get personally involved. Even if the story turns violent, he wants to stay “neutral” – by which I mean he wants to please his hosts to ensure future access. In short, if you are foreign, expect no help from him.

      To summarize, Debito, I think your analysis is spot-on. He closed the door behind him. But he will fade soon enough.

    12. Jim Di Griz Says:

      @ Dude#11

      My analysis of Don (completely off the cuff), is that he felt some kind of guilt at his role in what happened at Okinawa, threw himself into the reverse course of portraying the Japanese in a positive light in the international arena to make up for it, and in doing so became the ‘darling’ of the gay J-literature crowd (Mishima et al), leading to his belief that he is ‘accepted’ as ‘one of them’. It doesn’t really matter though. He is slamming doors closed in the faces of NJ and should be despised for that alone.

    13. dude Says:

      #12 Jim Di Griz – very interesting insight. Very possible. I agree he has earned his place at the top of the apologists list.

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