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  • Next screening of documentary SOUR STRAWBERRIES Sun June 14, Tokyo Univ Komaba Campus

    Posted by Dr. ARUDOU, Debito on June 9th, 2009

    Handbook for Newcomers, Migrants, and Immigrants to Japan\Foreign Residents and Naturalized Citizens Association forming NGO\「ジャパニーズ・オンリー 小樽入浴拒否問題と人種差別」(明石書店)JAPANESE ONLY:  The Otaru Hot Springs Case and Racial Discrimination in Japansourstrawberriesavatar

    Hi Blog.  In case you missed a chance to see documentary SOUR STRAWBERRIES, here’s your next chance.  Drop by Tokyo University Komaba Campus this coming Sunday afternoon and take in a screening.  It’s part of a Linguapax Asia Symposium this year.  Details and schedule as follows.  More on the documentary here.  Arudou Debito in Sapporo

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    http://www.linguapax-asia.org/

    2009 Linguapax Asia Symposium
    Theme: Human Trafficking
    June 14, 9:00 – 16:30
    University of Tokyo, Komaba Campus, Bldg. 18,
    4th Floor, Communication Room No 3

    ——————————————————————————————————————–
    With an estimated 900,000 victims annually, human trafficking is perhaps the major human rights issue of the 21st century. The 2009 Working Session of Linguapax Asia will discuss the connection of language with human trafficking and will explore the following:

    • How can language define the socio-political contexts of human trafficking?
    • How has human trafficking (both labor and sexual) been described historically (e.g. biblical sources and slave narratives)?
    • How have literary works described human trafficking?
    • How has human trafficking been portrayed by visual media?
    • How can the language of human experience explore human trafficking and the sex industry?

    ——————————————————————————————————————–
    Program
    9:00 Registration, Coffee

    9:30 Opening of Session, Frances Fister Stoga, Director, and Jelisava Sethna, Vice-Director, Linguapax Asia

    Morning Session. Chair: Jelisava Sethna

    9:35 Daniel H. Garrett, US Embassy, An Introduction to TIP (Trafficking in Persons): Scale, Types, and Definitions

    9:55 Olaudah Equiano: A reading from his narrative*

    10:00 Patricia Aliperti & Jason Aliperti, The Role of Education to Prevent the Trafficking in Children for Forced and Bonded Labor in India
    Q&A
    —————————
    10:35 – 11:00 Coffee
    ————————–

    11:00 Harriet Jacobs: A reading from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl*

    11:05 Stewart Dorward, Shumei High School, Slavery in the Bible

    11:25 Frederick Douglass: A reading from his narrative*

    11:30 Bill Gater, Rikkyo University, Proletarian Literature and Takiji Kobayashi’s Kanikosen”: Renewal of Interest in Times of Finacial Crisis

    11:50 Charles Cabell, Toyo University, “Troubled Waters” Within the History of Edo/Meiji Prostitution
    Q&A

    12:20 Peace Boat
    —————————-
    12:30 – 14:00 Lunch
    —————————-
    Afternoon Session. Chair: Frances Fister Stoga

    14:00 Marek Ignacy Kaminski, Swedish Writers’ Union, The Language of Human Experience: Human Trafficking and Diplomacy

    14:30 Uncle Tom’s Cabin – A reading*

    14:40 Debito Arudou, Hokkaido Information University, Documentary film: Sour Strawberries: Japan’s Hidden Guest Workers (2008, Tilman König and Daniel Kremers)
    Q&A
    —————————
    15:50 – 16:30 Coffee
    —————————
    16:30 WAM: The activities of Women’s Active Museum on War and Peace

    16:45 Closing of Session

    * Readings by Ann Jenkins, Tokyo International Players

    ENDS

    One Response to “Next screening of documentary SOUR STRAWBERRIES Sun June 14, Tokyo Univ Komaba Campus”

    1. Mark Hunter Says:

      Hi Debito. Hope all goes well. I just wanted to update you on a class I conducted with advanced level high school students with Sour Strawberries. As third in a series of documentaries (to study the genre) I was very pleasantly surprised with the level of questions and understanding shown by the students. I did not introduce the documentary as I didn’t want to influnece their opinions, I acted more as a moderator after the showing. They were, understandably, shocked, but seemed very clued in. This is the second time I watched it and felt, with a Japanese audience, that the directors actually did a very good job of portraying the ‘guest’ worker problem. Just thought you’d want to know. Keep up the good work. We’re rooting for you!

      – The directors and I very much want to know! Thanks for the feedback!

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